Thanksgiving Dinner Dangers for Your Dog

Everyone loves Thanksgiving. For many of us, it’s our favorite holiday of the year. The food, the fellowship, and all the excitement of the day help make memories that last a lifetime. But for our dogs, the food we enjoy on Thanksgiving can be a dangerous threat. Many of the foods we prepare for our holiday feast can be toxic to our dogs. Here are a few Thanksgiving dinner dangers for your dog.

A Simple Thing like Stuffing

My favorite part of Thanksgiving dinner is the stuffing. But for your dog, stuffing could send them to the emergency vet. Some ingredients that are commonly used in stuffing recipes are toxic to dogs.

Onions and Garlic – Perhaps the biggest Thanksgiving dinner dangers for your dog are onions and garlic. We use these vegetables to season many things we cook on Thanksgiving. Both onions and garlic belong to a genus of flowering plants called Allium, along with their culinary cousins, scallions, shallots, leeks and chives. All six of these edibles are toxic to dogs, even when cooked, dried or powdered. In severe cases, these common ingredients can even be fatal to you dog.

Thanksgiving dinner dangers for dogs

Both onions and garlic belong to a genus of flowering plants called Allium that are toxic to dogs.

Raisins – It is not known exactly why raisins and grapes are toxic to dogs. However, there have been many documented cases where they have caused poisoning. Even in small amounts they can be very dangerous. Symptoms to watch for are vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy and loss of appetite. Ultimately it can lead to kidney failure and death.

Macadamia nuts – Many recipes for stuffing use nuts, and around the holidays, macadamia nuts are often used. These, too, are toxic for our dogs. The amount of macadamia nuts a dog has to eat to be poisoned varies greatly, but in some cases can be very small. Symptoms can include ataxia (wobbliness), muscle tremors, and vomiting.

The Thanksgiving Toast

Alcohol, even in small amounts, can be toxic to dogs. It can cause harm either through ingestion or by absorbing through the skin. That spilled glass of wine can have dire effects if Fido gets to it before you do. Symptoms can take up to a half an hour to present, and can range from depression to over-activity. In extreme cases it can cause a heart attack and even death.

Thanksgiving dinner dangers for your dog

Alcohol, even in small amounts, can be toxic to dogs. It can cause harm either through ingestion or by absorbing through the skin.

Dessert and Coffee

There’s nothing like a piece of pie or cake with coffee to top off your Thanksgiving dinner. But both chocolate and caffeine are among the Thanksgiving dinner dangers for your dog. Chocolate is made from the roasted seeds of Theobroma cacao, which contain two substances toxic to dogs: caffeine and theobromine. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, muscle rigidity and rapid breathing.

Thanksgiving dinner dangers for your dog

Both chocolate and caffeine are among the Thanksgiving dinner dangers for your dog.

In all cases where you suspect your dog might have eaten or come in contact with something that is toxic, you should call your local emergency vet. Another option is to call the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center. That number is (888) 426-4435. Be aware that a $65 fee may apply. The best treatment, however, is prevention. Be sure to take extra precautions on Thanksgiving to ensure your family – including your dog – has a safe and rewarding holiday. You can do this by being particularly mindful of Thanksgiving dinner dangers for your dog.

‘Want to pin this post? We recommend this image for Pinterest!

Thanksgiving Dinner Dangers for Your Dog

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

22 Comments

    • Stacie – Exactly! It could even happen by accident. A child spills something and the family dog runs over to help him clean it up.

  1. This is worth a bookmark for any dog owner. Dogs have a knack for getting into things that are bad for them, and there are so many foods that are perfectly fine for us that can really hurt them!

    • That’s for sure, Danielle. My daughter’s dog would eat anything. We had to be extra careful when chopping onions, because if one fell one the floor, he’d have it in an instant.

  2. Such an important post!! Thank you SO much I will be sharing this!! We need to be hyper aware of what our pets can and can not eat! So many things are harmful to them! I just hope people pay attention! We love our pets and feel guilt for enjoying yummy meals so we give the pets scraps but we need to realize loving them means NOT giving it to them!

    • Wow! That could be another article right there, Joely! “Loving them means NOT giving it to them.” Thank you for your support.

  3. My friend’s dog got into Christmas candy last year and ate chocolate covered espresso beans. He had to be taken to the emergency vet, since chocolate and coffee are both so dangerous. I didn’t know about some of these other dangers.

    • You are more than welcome! And if you do use toxic ingredients, just make sure everyone in the house knows they’re off limits for Fido.

  4. As much as we wanted to just fill out dog’s tummy, we have to be careful about what you give them. Chocolates are delightful to humans, but its toxic to dogs. Thanks for all the tips!

  5. I knew about onions and chocolate. I don’t have any dogs, but I always make sure my girls don’t feed anyone elses dogs something they shouldn’t. It’s so important to always watch what you feed them.

  6. This is such an important post to know! We don’t have a dog, have never had one, so I have no idea what to do or what to avoid doing. This is very educational. Our daughter is asking for a dog and a cat every day many times, now I know what to expect and avoid when we do get one!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *